Ingleborough: A Wide Angle View

February 16, 2013  •  Leave a Comment

Ingleborough from Kingsdale with a 17mmTSEIngleborough from Kingsdale

I was hoping to get out and to try and capture some images of the asteroid 2012-DA14 which whistled past the earth last night but unfortunately the Yorkshire weather had other ideas.

 

Cloudy again, just for a change, but at least it was dry.  The forecast regarding the cloud cover wasn't particularly favourable, but earlier in the evening I'd been up Kingsdale as the sun was setting. There were plenty of breaks in the clouds then but, alas, they didn't last.

 

Still, while I was up there I had the opportunity to capture a couple of nice landscape images from one of my favourite locations. It was also an opportunity to really get to see just how much depth of field I could get using the tilt function on the Canon 17mm TSE lens.

 

Although small patches of snow persevered in the deeper more shaded depressions, the temperature was well above freezing. Well it was at least 5˚C, which meant I could comfortably work the controls of the lens and camera without gloves and still be able to feel my fingers. I tried a number of positions around the cairn, looking for a bit of foreground interest. I particularly like the grass at this time of year, the longer blades of grass from last years growth are bleached pale yellow, which I think contrasts well with the blueish grey of the limestone rocks.

 

As usual there is a pancake layer of cloud out towards the west over Morecambe Bay and the Irish Sea beyond that kills any dramatic sunset colour, just a subtle hint of orange escapes through thin gaps in the blanket of strato cumulus.

Ingleborough and Cairn, 17mm TSE from KingsdaleIngleborough from Kingsdale

 

 

 

 

 

I have the lens set with a slight downward tilt. This effective alters the plane of focus from one which is parallel to the film or sensor plane to one which is falling away at an angle. Instead of the depth of field being constrained between parallel near and far points, it is now conical, getting ever wider as it travels away from the camera. Using this characteristic, it is possible to achieve a much greater depth of field, in fact I can get everything in focus from the bottom of the tripod legs to infinity (and beyond).

 

I check this using the live view mode on the camera and checking both near and far points are in focus. aperture still effects depth of field except this time a wider aperture give a narrower cone of focus, a small aperture gives a wider cone of focus. I set the aperture on the camera to f11 to ensure that the top of the cairn remains in focus. with a wide aperture the base of the cairn would be in focus but the top would extend outside the cone of the depth of field resulting in it becoming unsharp.

 

I take a couple of shots from different position as the sun goes down. As it slips behind the lowest layer the temperature starts to fall and the moist air around Ingleborough rapidly condenses back into cloud hiding the summit until another day.


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